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Precision Tree - Good Catch #2 (and #3)

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Precision Tree – Good Catch #2 (and #3)

A “Good Catch” is a safety near miss or a close call – any unplanned event or unseen hazard that does not result in an injury, illness or damage but, had the potential to do so. I decided to start a series posting Good Catches to our Precision Tree Tales blog to help others recognize and deal with situations that may lead to injury, illness or damage BEFORE it can happen. Remember to be aware and stay safe out there!

A “Good Catch” is a safety near miss or a close call – any unplanned event or unseen hazard that does not result in an injury, illness or damage but, had the potential to do so.We have decided to start a series posting Good Catches to our page to help others recognize and deal with situations that may lead to injury, illness or damage BEFORE it can happen .www.precisiontreeservices.ca

An apprentice utility arborist removing a 120′ dead fir in tight quarters: 25,000 volt BCH line on the road, BCH service to the house to the left, maples and fir hemming the tree in behind and to the right.

Beautiful day for a big climb. 

After safely topping the tree, the AUA repels down (the stump was to be left to be removed at a later date). 

The CUA took note of the climber’s stopper knot and watched carefully. The AUA repelled down until his friction hitch was stopped by the stopper knot, a knot tied at the end of a climbing line to prevent the tail of the line from passing through the friction hitch. 

The AUA is forced to use his flip line to relieve tension on the climbing line to untie the bound knots. If it were not for the stopper knot tied in the tail of the climbing line the AUA would have fallen approximately 20ft to the ground. Always tie a stopper knot at the end of a climbing line. 

The worker safely down clmbing the remaining 20′ to the ground. 

While the aerial worker collects the gear from the climb, the ground worker starts moving the stacked and piled branch debris to the chipper. 

The CUA noticed the climber’s line caught in the branches and alerts the AUA to stand clear. 

The climbing line is pulled right into the mouth of the chipper by the gnarled, dead fir limb. 

A good example of a second “Good Catch” immediately after the first. Always keep climbing lines are kept clear from debris to prevent tangles, damage to line and injury to the aerial worker. 

The AUA back coiling the climbing line safely outside the danger zone. 

It is a good practice to coil and put away unused rope. It is best to put away ANY unused tools to avoid loss or damage. 

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